Spine and Movement Biomechanics Lab

Address

200 Lees Ave
Ottawa, Ontario

K1N 6N5
Canada

Contact

Ryan Graham: 1-613-562-5800  x1025

Office 1: 1-613-562-5800  x1739

Office 2: 1-613-562-5800  x4969

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Matthew Mavor

PhD Student
Supervised by Ryan 2014-2015; 2015-2017; 2018-2022

Matthew completed his Bachelor’s degree in Physical and Health Education at Nipissing University. Matthew was first exposed to research in his third year, where he volunteered in the Biomechanics and Ergonomics laboratory on a study entitled “The effects of experimentally induced low back pain on spine rotational stiffness and local dynamic stability”. He then went on to conduct an undergraduate thesis entitled “Exploring the relationship between local and global dynamic trunk stabilities during repetitive lifting tasks” under the supervision of Dr. Ryan Graham. Matthew then moved on to complete his Master’s degree at the University of Ottawa under the supervision of Dr. Ryan Graham. His thesis, entitled “The effects of protective footwear on spine control and lifting mechanics” focused on how different styles of protective footwear alter one’s ability to perform lifting based tasks. Matthew has collaborated with Dr. Dean Hay (Nipissing University) on two sporting-based investigations (i.e. weighted skates and independent crank cycling) and Erica Beaucage-Gauvreau (University of Adelaide).

The overarching goal of Matthew’s PhD thesis work will be to apply advanced data reduction and statistical modelling techniques (e.g., principal component analysis, linear discriminant functions) to objectively model changes in soldier movement behaviours caused by different body-borne equipment properties (e.g., physical load, stiffness, and bulkiness) and occupationally-relevant stresses (e.g., mission objectives, enemy threat, and temperature). These techniques will be used to enhance soldier training and to better understand the probability of soldiers experiencing musculoskeletal disorders or traumatic events.

Themes

  • Spine

  • Ergonomics

  • Whole-body movement quality and control
     

Funding Sources

  • Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology (QEII – GSST; 2018)

  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) PGS-D (2019-2022)

  • University of Ottawa Excellence Scholarship (2018-2021)

  • University of Ottawa Admission Scholarship (2015-2017)